Home News Call2Recycle Signs Deal with Wistron GreenTech

Call2Recycle Signs Deal with Wistron GreenTech

Electronics

Deal gives Call2Recycle collection center in central United States.

Recycling Today Staff June 4, 2013
The battery recycling program helmed by the stewardship organization Call2Recycle, based in Atlanta, has signed an operational agreement with Wistron GreenTech, a subsidiary of Wistron Corp., based in Taiwan. Call2Recycle says the agreement will increase sorting capacity for its battery recycling program. Wistron GreenTech operates an electronics recycling facility in McKinney, Texas.
 
According to Call2Recycle, the Wistron GreenTech site will be the second sorting facility Call2Recycle will use in the United States; its other collection center is located near Pittsburgh. 
 
Joseph Hsu, Wistron GreenTech general manager, says, "As a no-cost battery and cellphone recycling program, Call2Recycle helps preserve the environment by keeping rechargeable batteries out of landfills and the solid waste stream. Wistron GreenTech is a R2/RIOS (Responsible Recycling Practices/Recycling Industry Operating Standard) certified facility providing end-to-end corporate recycling solutions. Working with Call2Recycle not only supports our corporate goals but also demonstrates a greener solution for battery recycling."
 
Wistron’s process center is roughly 210,000 square feet. It is expected to handle the recycling of rechargeable batteries and cell phones collected from the western half of the country, estimated to be about 20 percent of the batteries Call2Recycle collects in the United States.
 
"Wistron has a long, successful history of complying with strict environmental guidelines around the world," says Steve O'Brien, Call2Recycle managing director of operations. "Their focus on sustainability through the long-term coexistence of human, natural and social environments makes Wistron GreenTech a great fit for Call2Recycle and positions us for future growth, as the volume of rechargeable batteries being collected for recycling increases."
 

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