Home News Biffa Recycling helps Birmingham Fruit Market Achieve Zero Waste to Landfill

Biffa Recycling helps Birmingham Fruit Market Achieve Zero Waste to Landfill

Municipal Recycling, International Recycling News

More than 3,300 metric tons of waste and recyclables will be collected under the deal each year.

Recycling Today Staff June 28, 2012
The U.K.’s Birmingham Fruit Market has achieved the goal of zero landfill waste following the implementation of a new service delivered by waste management provider Biffa, based in Buckinghamshire, U.K. 
 
Biffa, a provider of collection, treatment, recycling and technology-driven energy generation services for commercial and municipal waste, is collecting food and dry mixed recycling (DMR) as well as general waste and wood for Birmingham Fruit Market.
 
As the market commits to cut waste and boost its environmental performance, on average, more than 3,300 metric tons of food and DMR waste as well as cardboard, wood and general waste will be collected under the deal each year.
 
Commenting on the news, Biffa Group Sales and Marketing director Bob Barltrop says, “It is encouraging to see such iconic businesses as the Birmingham Fruit Market working with Biffa. It is a clear demonstration of the importance the food industry places upon environmental responsibility. It also makes very good business sense: Landfill tax costs continue to rise and increasingly, collection contracts such as this will be the most economical way for businesses of all sizes to deal with food and DMR as well as general waste.”
 
The food waste collected by Biffa will be processed at Poplars anaerobic digestion (AD) plant, at Cannock, Staffordshire, U.K., where it is turned into water, fertilizer and green energy.
 
Operated by Biffa, Poplars is one of the largest food AD plants in the country and has the capacity to process 120,000 metric tons of food waste every year, producing enough energy for 10,000 homes, Biffa says.
 
DMR waste will be processed at the Aldridge materials recycling facility, a state of the art facility that has the processing capacity of up to 300,000 metric tons annually, Biffa says.

 

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