QRS of Maryland to idle sorting plant

QRS of Maryland to idle sorting plant

The company says it is evaluating several proposals that may lead to a joint venture or acquisition of the facility.

August 11, 2017
Recycling Today Staff
Municipal / IC&I Plastics

Effective mid-August of 2017, the QRS of Maryland plant in the Baltimore area, which opened in November 2015, will be idled to enable an optimization of the equipment, according to a news release from the company.

The company says it is evaluating several proposals that may lead to a joint venture or acquisition of the facility. These proposals include well-tested European technology and novel technologies.

QRS of Maryland LLC is a joint venture between St. Louis-based QRS and Canusa Hershman Recycling Co., with corporate offices in Baltimore and in Branford, Connecticut. The recycling facility in Dundalk, Maryland, separates and recycles postconsumer plastics and features more than $10 million in processing equipment.

The QRS plant combines technology to separate plastics by resin type and recycle them into raw materials for new products and packaging. The facility incorporates the latest optical scanning and cleaning equipment and can process 4,500 tons of materials per month—nearly double the capacity of what’s presently available domestically, QRS of Maryland said when the facility was opened.

The QRS of Maryland facility was funded in part by the Closed Loop Fund, an investment fund that makes below-market loans for recycling infrastructure. The Dundalk plant was the Closed Loop Fund’s first investment in a full recycling facility.

While the fundamentals of the postconsumer plastic resin business are challenged, there is a growing consensus amongst consumer products companies, virgin resin producers and government agencies that the country must come to grips with the burgeoning plastic waste stream, QRS of Maryland says. Especially in light of China’s new National Sword restrictions, QRS of Maryland says it “is committed to being at the forefront of finding a viable domestic solution for postconsumer plastic waste and generating new opportunities for those in the USA recycling industry.”