GreenMantra Technologies adds new CEO

GreenMantra Technologies adds new CEO

Jodie Morgan brings experience in growing specialty chemicals, green technology and other high-value additive businesses to her new role.

Subscribe
February 1, 2018
Edited by Megan Workman
Personnel Plastics

GreenMantra Technologies, a company that produces polymers from scrap plastics based in Brantford, Ontario, has announced it has named Jodie Morgan as its new chief executive officer.

Morgan brings experience in growing specialty chemicals, green technology and other high-value additive businesses to her new role at GreenMantra. She previously served as president for several companies, including Pinova Inc., a global supplier of renewable rosin and polyterpene resin innovations; Solazyme Roquette Nutritionals LLC, a multinational food ingredients company; and SPI Polyols Inc., a global manufacturer of specialty polyols and sugars.

Morgan has served on the board of directors of GreenMantra since early 2017 and worked in close collaboration with the management team to develop the vision and strategy for the business, the company says.

“I am excited for the opportunity to lead GreenMantra through its next phase of growth as we look to expand our existing polyethylene- and polypropylene-based specialty polymers business, as well as accelerate bringing to market our new styrenic polymers made from waste polystyrene,” says Morgan.

She is a graduate of the University of Delaware with a degree in mechanical engineering and earned a master’s degree in business administration-finance from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Morgan has served on the board of directors of numerous companies and is the former chairwoman of Visage, a global association of chief executive officers.

GreenMantra Technologies converts recycled scrap polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) plastics, such as film, bottle caps and food containers, into high-value specialty polymers with uses in a broad range of industries. The company has developed new technology to convert scrap polystyrene (PS) into specialty styrenic polymers for use in inks, foam insulation and other applications. The company says it uses a proprietary thermocatalytic system and patented process to cost-effectively convert and “upcycle” scrap plastics, including hard-to-recycle materials such as grocery bags and film, into high-value polymers and other specialty chemicals. These materials have a broad range of applications in the coatings, plastics processing, adhesives, inks and roofing and paving industries.