Home News Plastics Recycler Expands South Carolina Plant

Plastics Recycler Expands South Carolina Plant

Plastics

Palmetto Synthetics will add a second recycling line to its facility in Kingtree, S.C.

Recycling Today Staff October 7, 2013
Palmetto Synthetics, a producer of staple fiber, has announced plans to invest about $1.1 million to expand its existing plastics recycling operations in Kingstree, S.C. The company, which handles polyester, nylon and other specialty polymers, had already expanded the facility in 2008 and 2010.

The expansion will include the addition of a second recycling facility and the construction of a 25,000-square-foot warehouse. The expansion is expected to be complete by the end of this year, the company says. 

Henry Poston, president of Palmetto Synthetics, says, “We are pleased with the opportunity to expand our operations here in Williamsburg County. South Carolina has provided us with an excellent business environment and a talented workforce, which has helped our company meet with success. We appreciate all the support we’ve received from state and local officials.”

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley says, “Today’s announcement is a win for one of our state’s rural areas. We celebrate Palmetto Synthetics’ decision to invest $1.1 million and add 20 new jobs in Kingstree. Expansions by our existing businesses continue to make the case that South Carolina is the place where a company can grow and prosper.”

“Our state’s recycling industry continues to grow and create jobs,” says Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt. “When a company like Palmetto Synthetics expands, it helps to make the surrounding communities sustainable. It also sends the message that South Carolina is just right for business.”

South Carolina’s Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved a rural infrastructure grant of $100,000 for real property improvements.

Poston says the company takes in flake from recycled plastics, primarily from the postconsumer side. It converts the material into pellets, which is then turned into a product that is used in the automotive, apparel and military sectors. The company also is selling some of its product to companies involved in the fracking sector. 

 
 

Sponsors

Current Issue

Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn