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Half of US has access to carton collection programs

Paper, Additional Commodities

The Carton Council of North America reports 50 percent of U.S. households can recycle cartons using curbside and local programs.

Recycling Today Staff July 8, 2014
The Carton Council of North America has announced that 50 percent of U.S. households have access to either curbside or local recycling programs for cartons.

“This milestone was achieved through industry collaboration and is the result of successful private-public partnerships,” says Jason Pelz, vice president of recycling projects for the Carton Council of North America and vice president, environment, Tetra Pak North America. “Thanks to the growing list of recycling program coordinators, facility operators and recycling company representatives who have recognized firsthand the value of carton recycling and who are committed to helping increase access.”

Pelz adds, “We have been able to achieve tremendous and unprecedented  growth, reaching 50 percent access in just five years. Every day, more of our customers and stakeholders get involved, and we welcome them with open arms.”

According to the Carton Council, recycling of cartons has grown by 177 percent over the last five years, starting at 18 percent in 2009 when the Carton Council was first formed. Since 2009, carton recycling access has been added to more than 36 million homes and is now in 77 of the 100 largest U.S. cities, the organization says. Today, more than 58 million homes in 46 states have access to carton recycling.

“There is no question that cartons are a growing packaging solution for many food and beverage products,” says Blaine McPeak, president of WhiteWave Foods. “Because they are an environmentally friendly package, ensuring there is an infrastructure in place for Americans to recycle them is a vital piece to the sustainability puzzle.”

For more information about the 50 percent milestone and the Carton Council, visit CartonOpportunities.org.
 

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