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Features - Scrap Industry News

The list of America's auto shredding plants has grown with the global metals boom.

Brian Taylor and Deanne Toto October 20, 2006

Some 220 auto shredding plants are tearing away at car bodies and other scrap across the country, according to the latest survey of the shredding plant landscape conducted by Recycling Today’s staff.

In the two years since this list was last published, pricing and demand for scrap metals have soared, giving shredder operators the confidence to upgrade many of the plants on the list. New plants have also been added.

Long-time shredding equipment vendor Jim Schwartz of Metso-Texas Shredder called the phenomenon "shredder mania" at the spring 2006 BIR (Bureau of International Recycling) World Recycling Convention. Schwartz said that he knew of some 26 shredding plants having been installed or that were underway between the October 2005 BIR meeting and the spring conference, which was held in late May of this year.

Schwartz estimated that about 25 percent of the plants were new shredder installations while the remainder were expansions or upgrades of existing plants.

He also noted that many of the new plants are large models powered by 6,000-hp or larger motors, as the world’s scrap recyclers push past more than 100 million tons of shredded scrap produced annually.

This year’s Recycling Today Auto Shredder list includes several new locations, including two plants opened by Midwest Metallics Inc. in Missouri (one in Kansas City and one in St. Joseph).

Two different recyclers, including St. Louis-based Alter Scrap Trading, have targeted Mobile, Ala., as an ideal site for a new shredder, with two new plants being installed in that Gulf Coast city. Other new plants have been or are being installed in Illinois, Iowa, North Carolina and Pennsylvania.

The following list indicates the current good health of the auto shredding industry, as few plants are now idled (as had been the case early this decade), and several new or planned shredder locations have been added.

As always in such endeavors, the staff of Recycling Today acknowledges that we may have missed a plant that should be on this list, retained an old company name or otherwise made a mistake. If you spot such a mistake, please do not hesitate to let us know. You can e-mail Editor Brian Taylor at btaylor@gie.net.

ALABAMA

Birmingham

ACIPCO (American Cast Iron Pipe Co.)

PSC Metals

ProTrade Steel Co. Ltd.

Decatur

Tennessee Valley Recycling

Mobile

Alter Scrap Processing (under construction)

David’s Auto Shredding (under construction)

ALASKA

Anchorage

Alaska Metal Recycling

ARIZONA

Glendale

Glendale Iron & Metal (shreds nonferrous metals)

Phoenix

Metal Management Arizona LLC

Tucson

Metal Management Arizona LLC

ARKANSAS

North Little Rock

A. Tenenbaum Co. Inc.

Texarkana

Tri-State Iron & Metal

CALIFORNIA

Anaheim

Adams Steel

Bakersfield

Golden State Metals Inc. (div. of Adams Steel)

Colton

Pacific Rail Industries (planned)

Long Beach

Pacific Coast Recycling LLC

Oakland

Schnitzer Steel Products Co.

Rancho Cucamonga

Pacific Coast Recycling LLC

Redwood City

Sims Hugo Neu

Terminal Island

Sims Hugo Neu

COLORADO

Colorado Springs

American Iron & Metal Metal Management – Colorado Springs

Denver

Metal Management Inc. – Denver

Western Metals Recycling

Englewood

All Recycling

Pueblo

American Iron & Metal

CONNECTICUT

North Haven

Metal Management Connecticut Inc.

South Norwalk

LaJoie’s Auto Wrecking Co.

FLORIDA

Baldwin

Global Shredding Technologies/Gerdau AmeriSteel

Jacksonville

Commercial Metals Co.

Miami

Ferrous Processing and Trading – Florida

Opa Locka

Everglades Recycling (Trademark Metals)

Orlando

Commercial Iron & Metals Co. Inc.

Pensacola

Auto-Shred Recycling LLC

Pinellas Park

Acre Iron & Metal Co. (Trademark Metals)

Rockledge

Trademark Metals Recycling LLC

St. Petersburg

Resource Recycling

Tampa

Trademark Metals Recycling LLC

GEORGIA

Athens

Carolinas Recycling Group LLC

Doraville

Newell Recycling of Atlanta Inc.

East Point

Newell Recycling of Atlanta Inc.

Lawrenceville

Blaze Recycling and Metals

HAWAII

Kapolei

Powerful Forces

Natural gas and diesel engines are used on many small to medium-sized shredders, typically on 60-inch to 80-inch class mills. There are also some installed with 98-inch mills.

 

People chose gas engines because they were cost effective, based on energy costs at the time of purchase, or because electrical power was unavailable.

 

A typical configuration would use two 1,750 hp, 1,100 rpm engines, mechanically mounted in parallel. This configuration requires sheaves, belts and jackshafts to lower the speed to 600 to 700 rpm, which is the speed recommended on 60-inch and 80-inch mills.

 

However, some shredder operators may be looking for alternatives to existing gas engine shredder drives for several reasons, including

·                 Higher fuel costs

·                 Volatility in fuel prices

·                 Substandard productivity

·                 High maintenance costs.

 

For these operators, electric motors become the best alternative. They may offer these potential advantages:

·                 Energy cost savings, although fuel costs and electricity costs vary in different areas

·                 Comparative energy price stability

·                 Better productivity; electric motors have an overload capability that allows them to work through loads, while gas engines can sag

·                 Lower maintenance costs

·                 Lower environmental impact.

 

There are two types of electric motors commonly used on shredders, AC and DC. Both have advantages and disadvantages.

AC motor advantages can include:

·                 Only choice for 120” Super Shredders

·                 Good overload capabilities

·                 Very commonly used in the shredder industry

·                 New motors available in any hp or speed.

 

AC disadvantages can include:

·                 High inrush with load – flicker lights in neighborhood – high demand charges

·                 Long lead times

·                 Motor brush maintenance

·                 Liquid rheostat maintenance and cooling water requirements.

 

Potential advantages of DC motors can include:

·                 Lowest initial cost for 4,000 hp and below

·                 Short lead times

·                 Preferred by power companies– limit power spikes on load

·                 Better control – run at any speed, jog forward and reverse to clear jams.

 

And potential DC disadvantages can be:

·                 Motor brush maintenance

·                 Not available for super-sized shredders.

 

 

In terms of gas engine retrofits, the advantages of DC systems can meet with the goals of people who want to replace their gas engines.

 

DC motors are only available in a 4000 hp and below configuration. But since almost all the gas engines are on 80-inch and smaller mills, this horsepower is perfect. With the overload capabilities of an electric motor, yards can expect to see significant performance gains.

 

When doing a retrofit, it is all about return on investment (ROI). With a low initial cost, this retrofit will pay for itself very quickly in energy costs savings alone.

 

When ordering a new shredder, the shredder itself may take 40 or more weeks to install, so a long lead time on the AC motor doesn’t delay the project. But with a retrofit, having a 12 to 16 week lead time on a DC system can have a major impact on the project.

 

Many sites put in gas engines because the power company would not allow the yard to put in an AC motor in the first place. Because of the lower power spikes under load, DC systems can be installed in many places the AC motors can not. Note that the DC system usually does not require line upgrades from the power company or expensive power correction equipment.

 

Among the successful conversions is one at Darlington Shredding in South Carolina. In 2004, the company was running an 80-inch mill powered by two 2,200 hp diesel engines. It was looking for more horse power and converted to two 2,500 hp DC motors. The motors are direct coupled in series to the mill. The plant’s operators say they have experienced a dramatic increase in productivity and decrease in energy costs.

 

At the Atlantic Scrap location in Smithfield, N.C., the company decided to replace two 1,750 hp natural gas engines, running a 94-inch mill with two 2,300 hp DC motors.

 

They kept their belt and sheaves so they could run the mill faster and produce more horsepower. Low cost and short delivery were key components to their decision to go with DC.

 

-By Joseph Crosetto, Recycling Industry Manager for Quad Plus, a supplier of DC shredder drives.

Hawaii Metal Recycling

ILLINOIS

Bourbonnais

Belson Scrap & Steel (operates a smaller steel shredder)Chicago

Metal Management (4)

General Iron Industries Inc. (2)

East St. Louis

St. Louis Auto Shredding (div. of Pielet Brothers Trading)

Peoria

Allied Iron & Steel

Behr – Peoria

South Beloit

Behr – Beloit

Sterling

Cimco Recycling

INDIANA

East Chicago

OmniSource Corp. – Chicago Div.

Evansville

J. Trockman & Sons Inc.

Fort Wayne

OmniSource Corp.

MuncieOmniSource Corp. – Muncie (formerly Dobrow Industries Inc.)

Indianapolis

Capital City Metals LLC

OmniSource Corp. (planned)

Kokomo

Mervis Industries

IOWA

Council Bluffs

Alter Scrap Processing

Davenport

Alter Scrap Processing

Mason City

Behr Iron

Sioux City

Sioux City Compressed Steel Co.

Spencer

Shine Bros.

Waterloo

Alter Scrap Processing

Wilton

Gerdau Ameristeel Shredder

KANSAS

Hutchinson

Midwest Iron & Metal Co. Inc.

Kansas City

Galamba Metals Group LLC– Kaw River Shredding Yard

Wichita

Glickman Metal Recycling (div. of Yaffe I&M)

KENTUCKY

Ashland

Mansbach Metal Co.

Henderson

River Metals Recycling LLC

Louisville

River Metals Recycling LLC

Newport

River Metals Recycling LLC

LOUISIANA

Baton Rouge

Southern Scrap Xpress Recycling

LaPlaceMississippi River Recycling (div. of Bayou Steel)

Monroe

Auto Shred of Louisiana

New Orleans

Southern Scrap Material Co. (div. of European Metal Recycling)

MAINE

Auburn

Maine Metal Recycling Inc. (light iron shredder)

Topsham

Grimmel Industries

MARYLAND

Baltimore

Baltimore Scrap Corp.

Recovermat (shreds demolition debris)

United Iron & Metal

Capitol Heights

Joseph Smith & Sons Inc.

Hagerstown

Conservit Inc.

MASSACHUSETTS

Brockton

Brockton Iron & Steel Co.

Everett

Prolerized New England Co.

Greenfield

WTE Recycling Inc.

MICHIGAN

Detroit

Ferrous Processing and Trading Co. (2)

Flint

Spooner Metals

Grand Rapids

Louis Padnos Iron & Metal

Holland

Louis Padnos Iron & Metal

Jackson

OmniSource Corp.

Kalamazoo

Kalamazoo Metal Recyclers Inc.

Kingsford

East Kingsford Iron & Metal

Sturgis

Sturgis Iron & Metal Co. Inc.

Taylor

Fritz Enterprises Inc.

MINNESOTA

Duluth

Bay Side Recycling Corp.

St. Cloud

American Iron & Metal (steel clips shredder)

St. Paul

AMG Resources Corp.

MISSISSSIPPI

Flowood

General Recycling

Greenville

Metal Management Inc.

MISSOURI

Kansas City

Galamba Metals Group, Galamet Yard

Midwest Scrap Management

St. Joseph

Midwest Scrap Management

St. Louis

PSC Metals

NEBRASKA

Columbus

Columbus Metal Industries

NEVADA

Las Vegas

Silver Dollar Recycling

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Claremont

Advanced Recycling (Schnitzer Steel Ind.)

Concord

Advanced Recycling (Schnitzer Steel Ind.)

Madbury

New England Metal Recycling LLC

NEW JERSEY

Camden

Camden Iron & Metal Inc.

Clifton

American Shredding Industries

Parkway Iron and MetalMillville

Cumberland Recycling Corp.

Jersey City

Sims Hugo Neu

Newark

Metal Management Northeast Inc./

NIMCO Shredding

Trenton

Mercer Wrecking and Recycle Corp.

Trenton Iron and Metal Corp.

NEW MEXICO

Albuquerque

Albuquerque Metals Recycling

NEW YORK

Brooklyn

Brooklyn Resource Recovery Inc.

Gershow RecyclingBuffalo

Gerdau AmeriSteel Shredder

Green Island

R. Kelly Freedman & Son Inc.

Lindenhurst

Gershow Recycling (shredder is idle)

Long Island City

Sims Hugo Neu

Medford

Gershow Recycling

North Chili

Metalico Inc. (formerly Union Processing)

Owego

Upstate Shredding LLC

Rensselaer

Rensselaer Iron & Steel Inc. (also own Grimmel Industries of Maine)

Rochester

Genesee Scrap

SyracuseRoth Steel Corp.

NORTH CAROLINA

Charlotte

Southern Metals Co. Inc.

Greensboro

D.H. Griffin Wrecking Co.

Kernersville

Atlantic Scrap & Processing

Monroe

Metal Recycling Services

Smithfield

Atlantic Scrap & Processing

Statesville

L. Gordon Iron & Metal Co.

Wilmington

Atlantic Scrap & Processing

OHIO

Akron

City Scrap & Salvage Co.

Canton

PSC Metals

Cleveland

Ferrous Processing & Trading – Cleveland

Columbus

Columbus Auto Shredding

PSC MetalsMansfield

Milliron Industries

Marietta

American Car Crushing

Toledo

OmniSource Corp.

Toledo Shredding LLC

West Carrollton

Metal Shredders Inc.

Wooster

Wooster Iron & Metal Co.

Youngstown

Youngstown Iron & Metal Inc.

OKLAHOMA

Arkoma

Yaffe Iron and Metal

Oklahoma City

CFF Recycling USA

Standard Iron & Metal Co. Inc.

Sand Springs

Sand Springs Metal Processing

OREGON

Portland

Schnitzer Steel Products Co.

PENNSYLVANIA

Beaver Falls

PSC Metals

Coatesville

Coatesville Scrap Iron & Metal

Erie

Liberty Iron & Metal Co.

Harrisburg

Consolidated Scrap Resources

Philadelphia

SPC Corp. (div. of Camden Iron & Metal Inc.)

Pittsburgh

Neville Metals

Tube City Inc.

Schuylkill Haven

U.S.S. Achey Inc.

Temple

Royal Green LLC/AMG Resources

Wilkes-Barre

DMS Shredding Inc.

Williamsport

Penn Recycling

York

J & K Shredding

RHODE ISLAND

Johnston

Metals Recycling LLC

SOUTH CAROLINA

Darlington

Darlington Shredding Co.

Dillon

Lockamy Scrap Metal Inc.

Hemingway

Don’s Scrap & Iron

Lexington

Commercial Metals Co. (CMC – Lexington)

Spartanburg

Carolinas Recycling Group LLC

TENNESSEE

Chattanooga

PSC Metals

Halls

Hutcherson Metals (2)

Harriman

PSC Metals

Jackson

Gerdau Ameristeel Shredder

Hutcherson Metals Co.

Johnson City

Johnson City Iron & Metal Co.

Knoxville

PSC Metals

Memphis

Metal Management Inc.

Morristown

Morristown Iron & Metal

Nashville

PSC Metals

Pulaski

Tennessee Valley Recycling LLC

TEXAS

Beaumont

Commercial Metals Co.

Corpus Christi

Commercial Metals Co.

Dallas

Commercial Metals Co.

Eagle Pass

Newell Recycling Co.

El Paso

Newell Recycling of El Paso

Houston

CFF Pro-Metal Processing Co.

Rose Metal Processing

Texas Port Recycling (div. of David J. Joseph Co.)

Midland

Commercial Metals Co.

Midlothian

TXI Chaparral Steel

San Antonio

Monterrey Iron & Metal

Newell Recycling of San AntonioSeguin

Commercial Metals Co. (SMI-Texas)

Vinton

Commercial Metals Co.

WacoM. Lipsitz & Co. Inc.

UTAH

Plymouth

Western Metals Recycling LLC

Salt Lake City

Metal Management West Inc.

Western Metals Recycling LLC

VIRGINIA

Chesapeake

Sims Hugo Neu

Lorton

Davis Industries Inc.

Montvale

Shredded Products Corp.

Petersburg

Sims Hugo Neu

Richmond

Sims Hugo Neu

WASHINGTON

Seattle

Seattle Iron and Metal

Tacoma

Schnitzer Steel Inc.

Vancouver

Pacific Coast Shredding

WEST VIRGINIA

Wheeling

Automatic Recycling

WISCONSIN

Fond Du Lac

Sadoff Iron & Metal Co.

Green Bay

Samuels Recycling Co.

Madison

Samuels Recycling Co.

Milwaukee

Miller Compressing Co. (2)

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