Home News Two Newark locations earn SFI certification

Two Newark locations earn SFI certification

Paper, Certification

Company’s facilities in Massachusetts and Wisconsin receive Sustainable Forestry Initiative's chain-of-custody certification.

Recycling Today Staff March 10, 2014
Newark Recycled Paperboard Solutions, Cranford, N.J., has announced that it has achieved Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) chain-of-custody certification at its mills in Fitchburg, Mass., and Milwaukee.

Through SFI chain-of-custody certification, companies must have a tracking system in place so they can tell customers the percentage of fiber from certified forests, certified sourcing and/or postconsumer recycled content. 

“Newark Recycled Paperboard Solutions is proud to display the SFI label on our products,” says Marc Hingsbergen, corporate sustainability director for Newark Recycled Paperboard Solutions. “It shows we are contributing to the protection of water quality and conservation of wildlife habitat and biodiversity."

SFI is a comprehensive, independent certification nonprofit program that works with environmental, social and industry partners to improve forest practices in North America and fiber sourcing worldwide. More than 250 million acres are certified to the SFI forest management standard in North Americamaking it the largest single forest standard in the world, the group says. It is based on 14 core principles that promote sustainable forest management, including measures to protect water quality, biodiversity, wildlife habitat, species at risk and Forests with Exceptional Conservation Value.

Newark Recycled Paperboard Solutions operates 34 facilities throughout North America. The company says that its paper mill division and three of its converted products division sites (Franklin, Ohio; Chicago; and Los Angeles) are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Chain of Custody certified under FSC trademark license codes FSC-C002782 and FSC-C004701.

 
 

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